The Truth About Squirting :

Updated: Mar 2

SAPIO MAGAZINE GETS TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PEE OR PLEASURE? DEBATE


By Keisha Mitchell

Over the last twenty years, the phenomena of female ejaculation (affectionately referred to as “squirting” in the American pornographic and colloquial lexicon) has become all the rage and a source of great mystery. After all, the female body and it’s behaviors during sex really became a source of scientific inquiry during the Victorian Era and since then, while many strides have been made in the field of Womens’ health, the vagina and its infrastructure remain a modern medical mystery.


“During sexual stimulation, many women, whether they profess to be squirters or not, note feeling a tingling sensation (similar to that of having to tinkle) during sex, or nearing the time for them to ”cum”. For many women, the sensation never crosses a threshold and if they do ejaculate, they tend to produce a small (or sometimes large) amount of “milky white fluid” according to “the Journal of Sexual Medicine."

We’re not exactly sure who the first Lady to squirt on film was, but somewhere around the late nineties to early 2000s, interest in female ejaculation took a spike and pretty soon whole fetishist categories were devoted to the display of feminine release. Even self help and DIY literature and educational films have been produced in droves trying to not only help women who don’t “squirt” but to also help answer the question of “what exactly is that fluid?” for both men and women interested in catching the back splash. One of the things to consider when answering the question about the nature of vaginal fluid is the internal structure of the female anatomy. Unlike a male, the female body s’ bladder, and urethra (the opening in which urine flows through), and the cervix (the opening in which phalluses are inserted, and is also the passageway babies must take to be born) are very near one another, and are both “inside” the protection of the vaginal walls. During sexual stimulation, many women, whether they profess to be squirters or not, note feeling a tingling sensation (similar to that of having to tinkle) during sex, or nearing the time for them to ”cum”. For many women, the sensation never crosses a threshold and if they do ejaculate, they tend to produce a small (or sometimes large) amount of “milky white fluid” according to “the Journal of Sexual Medicine”. Many other women, however, do cross a threshold with the sensation and release a much larger gush of clear fluid (often reported as enough to fill a cup) from their urethra. Recently, a French research team led by Samuel Salama from the Hopital Prive De Parlay II, recruited a test group of several, healthy women who claimed to be squirters. Through, pelvic ultrasounds, and biochemical analysis of the fluid samples after their sexual arousal, Salama and his team discovered that all of the women had empty bladders before they’re excitement, and during their arousal, ultrasound scans found their bladders filling up quickly with urine. Through testing the squirting sample after it had been released, each of fluid samples not only tested positively for the presence of urine, but urea, and uric acid (all ingredients of healthy urine) though the fluid itself proved colorless. Ultrasound scans taken after the women’s’ sexual release also proved that the bladder had been emptied. Proving conclusively that the fluid collected and released during sex was urine. Salama and his team have defined squirting as “the involuntary emission of urine during sexual activity”. So where does that leave all squirters and their devotees? We;re not exactly sure, but we are certain whomever you just lost the bet to about whether or not squiriting is urine will be happy to hear the good news.

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